3 Ways You Think You’re “Job Hunting” But Really Aren’t

So I’ve been in the recruitment scene for a while now, and I was fortunate to have had the chance to work with different young individuals on their approach towards applying for jobs. At this point, I write this article with a little bit of frustration from hearing the usual “I’ve been job hunting for ages, but I haven’t been finding anything!”

I’m writing this because I want to shed some light on the misconceptions we have around the concept of job hunting, and what really counts as “Job hunting”.

Here are 3 things that a lot of people do and believe that because they’re doing these things, they’re actually “Job hunting” and trying really hard. This belief is the core of the frustration of young people, mostly because none of the things ever bring any tangible results.

1- Sending an empty email with your CV

The top mistake that I see so many people making is spamming their CV everywhere, and doing it without any context what so ever. You need to understand that every company receives at least 5 empty emails with CVs per week, and this is IF they’re a small company. Can you imagine how many emails a big company receives? Sending an empty email without writing any form of a personalized email to the person you're addressing makes you appear lazy, uninterested in the company, and just looking for anything at this point. As an employer, I’m uninterested in hiring someone who’s looking for “Anything”, I want someone who wants my company, and is genuinely interested in our mission.

2- Generic cover letters

“I am looking to work in an exciting place that matches my education and experience.” How almost every cover letter starts.
Now, that’s a given, why would you write something that sounds like you just copied off Google? If you’re applying for a company, tell the company why you’re applying for this specific company, tell them what caught your interest, tell them why you think you’d actually be a good fit for them. Stop worrying about sounding professional by using generic fancy CV words and use your cover letter for a more personal approach, that’s the way to go.

3- Applying with CVs that have spelling mistakes

Look, I wish I can write a lot under this point, but it's 2017 if an employer can't trust you to spell check your own CV, do you think they’ll trust you with a job?

None of us have great language skills and that’s okay, but you have to overcome your weaknesses by checking your spelling through different tools, and checking with people/friends if your language is correct or not.

Bottom line is:

The bigger the attitude you have of “I just want any job!”, the less likely you are to get hired by anyone.

The way to do it? Here’s a simple process:

1- Ask yourself and outline the type of companies you’d enjoy working for.
2- Research and make a list of these companies in your country.
3- Try to find a direct point of contact in the company (LinkedIn is perfect for this)
4- Apply with a personalized email/cover letter/CV. Tell them WHY you’re applying and tell them why they should take a minute to notice you.

The job scene out there is tough, yes. But you just need the right approach, and we’re more than happy to support you through that at Majra as well. Feel free to get in touch with us at hello@majra.me for more support on how you could apply in a more personalized manner for vacancies.

Mahmood Zeyad

An awkward human being who believes in the value of taking actions vs. talking about actions. Always excited by the potential of passionate human beings, and genuinely annoyed by people that hate their jobs. This annoyance led me to co-founding Majra, a platform to help people find jobs that make them happy, seriously.

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